Mar
07
2020

Eat Right for a Long Life

Dr. Felice Gersh gave a talk at a conference in Las Vegas stressing the importance to eat right for a long life. This was at the 27th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine in Las Vegas from Dec. 13 to 15th, 2019. The actual title of her presentation was “Nutrition for Longevity”.
Dr. Gersh has a fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona School of Medicine.

In the first place she pointed out that an anti-inflammatory diet consists of vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, healthy oils like olive oil and fish. This is a modified Mediterranean diet. On the other hand, with a pro-inflammatory diet or Western diet, you eat high fat, cholesterol, lots of protein from red beef, high sugar, excessive salt and a lot of processed and fast-food.

Prevention of diseases

It is important to realize that for prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer and degenerative diseases you need to eat fruits and vegetables, which contain important phytochemicals. They contain a wide variety of molecules, like carotenoids, vitamins and polyphenols. Another key point is that cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and kale) contain glucosinolates, which are sulfur-containing compounds. They protect you from cancer.

Vitamins and magnesium

It must be remembered that in order to strengthen the immune system and prevent hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) we need the following: omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, the enzyme Co-Q10, vitamin A, B complex, C, D, E, carotenoids, phytosterols, stilbenes and flavonoids. Another key point is that magnesium is extremely important. Many of our dietary habits have reduced magnesium intake to a minimum. Our soils are depleted of magnesium, it is no longer in drinking water, and it is absent in processed foods. However, magnesium is involved as a co-factor in more than 700 enzymatic reactions in our bodies. Magnesium is involved in heart contractions, is important to maintain our blood pressure and is important for glycemic control. It is also important for bone development and for DNA and RNA synthesis. Magnesium binds serotonin and dopamine to their receptors and plays a role in many more body functions.

Brassica vegetables

This group of vegetables consists of broccoli, cauliflower, green cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Notably, they have long been recognized to lower the risk of many cancers. The first thing to remember is that the active ingredients in them are glucosinolates and isothiocyanates. Certainly, food preparation has a lot of influence on maintaining beneficial substances in the brassica vegetables. To emphasize, finely shredded vegetables had a marked decline of their glucosinolate levels by 75% within only 6 hours. On the negative side, microwave cooking destroys 74% of glucosinolates, but on the positive side, storage in room air preserves almost all of the glucosinolates for 1 week. In addition, stir frying brassica also preserves the glucosinolates. This reference points out how fruit and vegetables can contribute to cancer prevention.

The gut microbiome

The Western diet leads to a change in the gut flora with Gram-negative bacteria taking over the healthy gut flora and disrupting the intestinal barrier. To emphasize, this result is called endotoxemia. Part of this is increased serum endotoxin, which mainly consists of lipopolysaccharides. Indeed, it causes gut inflammation and a breakdown of the gut barrier. When this happens, autoimmune antibodies are produced. To put it another way, the Western diet undermines your health. In a word, high fat foods and added sugars (refined carbohydrates) lead to increased Gram-negative bacteria and the disruption of the intestinal barrier.

An unhealthy diet causes disease

In the long run this causes autoimmune diseases, leads to higher heart attack rates and to diabetes. Healthy gut bacteria in fact help to digest fibre, which leads to three short-chain fatty acids: butyrate, acetate and propionate. For the most part, they are important as energy source, affect cardiometabolic health and appetite. On balance, butyrate also helps to maintain the blood brain barrier.

Importance of fiber

Higher fiber content in food leads to less cardiovascular disease, has positive effects on obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Fiber changes the microbiome in the gut, leads to less gut permeability and more short-chain fatty acids production.

The best diet

  • 60% to 70% complex carbohydrates are the foundation of a healthy diet. It consists of vegetables, green leafy and root vegetables, beans, legumes, whole grains and fruit.
  • Eat healthy fats from nuts, olives, seeds, krill or fish oil. Limit fat intake to 18 to 28% of your daily calorie intake. Avoid hydrogenated fats. Limit your saturated fatty acid intake. 85% chocolate is OK. Otherwise consume olive oil and omega-3 fatty acid containing foods (from seafood and fish).
  • Add about 12% of the daily calorie consumption as protein per day. Choose fish, seafood, lean cuts of chicken, only the occasional red meat (organic or grass-fed meat)
  • Eat lots of fiber, eat organic and minimally processed food. Limit sugar, fat and salt. Avoid antibiotics from the agricultural industry, sweeteners, gluten and excessive alcohol intake. Take a daily probiotic and eat probiotic food. Eat three meals a day, a big breakfast, a moderately-sized lunch and a small dinner. A fasting mimicking diet once per month for 5 days activates your longevity genes.
Eat Right for a Long Life

Eat Right for a Long Life

Conclusion

Dr. Felice Gersh gave a talk at a conference in Las Vegas. This was at the 27th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine in Las Vegas from Dec. 13 to 15th, 2019. She said that we need to eat right for a long life. She gave a thorough outline of what to eat and what not to eat. It is important to note that she suggested to cut out additional refined sugar and processed food. The bacteria in the gut must be normal, or the gut barrier breaks down. This failure can cause autoimmune diseases. Eating lots of vegetables and fruit as well as fiber will help to keep your gut bacteria normal.

What foods to eat

A Mediterranean type diet gives you the right foods that you need for your health. Avoid the Standard American diet as it is unhealthy and kills the good gut bacteria. Brassica vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, green cabbage and Brussels sprouts prevent the development of many cancers. Eat three meals a day, a big breakfast, a moderately-sized lunch and a small dinner. This fits best into the diurnal rhythm of your gut bacteria.

 

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Jan
18
2020

Antibiotics In Children Can Trigger Allergies And Asthma Later In Life

Whoever treats a child’s cold must know that antibiotics in children can trigger allergies and asthma later in life. This is what a study released on Dec. 20, 2019 has shown. The researchers examined records of 798,426 children seen at the Department of Defense TRICARE health care program. They were born between 2001 and 2013. The physicians examined the children later again for allergies. The more antibiotics the children received in childhood, the more severe the youngster’s allergies were later in life.

More details about the study

The researchers found that different antibiotic types had different risks to cause allergic reactions later in life.

  • Penicillin: 1.3-fold risk
  • Penicillin with a β-lactamase inhibitor: 1.21-fold risk
  • Macrolides: 1.28-fold risk)
  • Cephalosporins: 1.19-fold risk
  • Sulfonamides: 1.06-fold risk

The type of allergies that the children developed later in life were food allergies, anaphylaxis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis or contact dermatitis. The researchers stressed that their finding indicated an association between taking antibiotics and developing allergies later. It was not a causal relationship.

Food allergies in more detail

Anaphylaxis

This allergic condition is an emergency and requires immediate medical attention. It can occur when the body overreacts to peanuts or penicillin. It can occur with foods, and the reaction is sudden and severe. The symptoms may include wheezing, shortness of breath, a cough or tightness in the throat. The blood pressure may drop leading to light-headedness and passing out. The skin may show hives, swelling and a rash. The digestive symptoms may be nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Other symptoms may involve itching eyes, headaches, anxiety and a feeling of impending doom.

Asthma

Airborne grass and tree pollens, mold spores and dust, but also peanuts and other strong allergens can trigger an asthma attack. The symptoms can be shortness of breath, wheezing, tightness in the chest, trouble falling asleep because of coughing and being short of breath.

Atopic dermatitis (eczema)

Often atopic dermatitis starts below the age of 5 and can last until late adolescence or adulthood. The symptoms can be dry skin, itching red patches of skin and thickened scaly skin. Allergic contact dermatitis is common in patients with atopic dermatitis.

Allergic rhinitis

People who suffer from allergic rhinitis are sensitized to particles in the air like grass and tree pollen, molds or cigarette fumes. They develop a stuffy nose, itching and watery eyes, sneezing and swelling around the eye lids. An allergist can do skin scratch tests to find out what the patient is allergic to. Subsequently, if the allergies are strong, the allergist may decide to start desensitization with allergy shots.

Allergic conjunctivitis

A person who is allergic to pollen and mold spores will react to this when in contact with it and often develop allergic conjunctivitis. An eye inflammation will develop within a few minutes leading to swelling of the conjunctiva around the eye ball. The eyes end up looking red, itching, burning and being watery.

Contact dermatitis

Contact dermatitis develops when your body brushes against a substance that your body has been previously sensitized to. One example is poison ivy contact dermatitis. But many other substances can cause similar reactions: solvents, shampoos, permanent wave solutions and rubbing alcohol. In addition, plants, bleach and detergents, fertilizers, pesticides and airborne substances (sawdust, dust from woollen materials) can also do the same.

The gut biome

Dr. Purvi Parikh is an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health in New York. She was not involved in the study, but commented to it as follows: “One reason why there might be an association is because our microbiome, specifically in our gut, plays a large role in our immune systems. Antibiotics are known to not only kill the bacteria that are causing an infection, but also ‘good’ bacteria our immune system needs to protect us from developing allergic or autoimmune diseases.”

Treat bacterial infections with antibiotics when needed

She went on to say: “Overall, parents should know that this study shows an association but not necessarily cause and effect. So, if a child truly needs an antibiotic for a bacterial infection, they should not withhold it due to fear of allergic disease. However, on that same note, one should not over use antibiotics if not needed – for a virus or a cold – as there may be long-term consequences from over use.”

Antibiotics In Children Can Trigger Allergies And Asthma Later In Life

Antibiotics In Children Can Trigger Allergies And Asthma Later In Life

Conclusion

A new study showed that antibiotics can cause allergies and asthma later in life. The reason seems to be that our gut bacteria react to the antibiotics and the gut dysbiosis (disbalance of the gut bacteria) persists, when the antibiotics have been discontinued. The immune system can then react in ways that are detrimental to the child and adolescent. Anaphylaxis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis or contact dermatitis are all different manifestations of allergies that can develop later in life. At this point we only know that there is an association between these allergic manifestations and the antibiotic use in childhood. More clinical trials will need to shed a light on what causes allergies in some children, but not in others.

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