Dec
01
2006

Rotigotine Patch For Parkinson’s Also Helps Restless Leg Syndrome

One of the difficulties in curative medicine is compliance. There are various aspects: patients dislike the feeling of dependency on medications. In some cases there is a dislike for swallowing that pill, and if medications have to be taken several times per day, it can present even more of a challenge. People are busy with their daily routines, they may forget the one or the other dose, and it may very well compromise the effectiveness of a medication.

Various medications can now be administered through a transdermal patch. For sufferers of Parkinson’s disease a new transdermal treatment with the dopamine agonist rotigotine (brand name Neupro®) has been tested. It can become the first line of defense and ease the symptoms. The transdermal patch was generally safe, and as it was well tolerated, patients did not discontinue the treatment. The treatment with rotigotine can help postpone the commonly used medication levodopa, which tends to lose effectiveness over the years.
Another study with the rogitotine patch showed effectiveness for individuals suffering from restless leg syndrome. This disorder makes sleep difficult, and as a result the patient turns sleepy during wakeful hours. Dr. Karin Stiasny-Kolster, a neurologist at Phillips University in Marburg, Germany reported on favorable results with 340 patients suffering of restless leg syndrome.

Rotigotine Patch For Parkinson's Also Helps Restless Leg Syndrome

Rotigotine Patch For Parkinson’s Also Helps Restless Leg Syndrome

In a controlled study, those patients who were wearing the rotigotine patch were showing improvement. Again, the transdermal system was well tolerated and safe and there was no problem with fluctuating dopamine levels. Placebo-treated patients did not respond. The product has been released in European countries and the FDA is investigating for release in the US soon.

More information about restless leg syndrome: http://nethealthbook.com/neurology-neurological-disease/restless-leg-syndrome/

Reference: The Medical Post, November 3, 2006, page 57-58

Comment: The FDA approved the patch under the name “Neupro-P”. Here is a meta analysis. It shows that the drug improved symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. but it also was associated with more side effects.

Last edited November 2, 2014

Aug
01
2003

Parkinsons Disease From Too Much Meat And Too Little Vitamin B2

Parkinsons disease (correct medical spelling is ” Parkinson’s disease”) is a degenerative disease of the brain stem that presents with symptoms of shaking, tremor and gait problems.

It is a neurological disease of the elderly and often is a cause of disability leading to institutionilisation. New research at the University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP) in Brazil has found that a diet rich in vitamin B2 and low in meat has helped to improve patients with Parkinsons disease.

It appears that it may not only be useful in alleviating symptoms of existing disease, but even more importantly to prevent this neurological disorder from developinlg. Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra stated that in Buenos Aires (where the study was done) the consumption of meat is one of the highest in the world as is the rate of Parkinsons disease. Under his guidance a research team found that about 15% of the population do not absorb vitamin B2 adequately. In combination with excessive red meat intake a significant proportion of the population does not absorb enough of this vitamin resulting in Parkinsons disease.

In this study a group of patients with advanced Parkinsons disease were put on a special diet that included milk (which is a good source of vitamin B2). Other sources of vitman B2 as shown here were cereal, nuts, milk, eggs, green leafy vegetables and lean meat. Within one month 18% of their motor function had returned to normal. After the third month of this diet 60% of the motor function had returned.

Parkinsons Disease From Too Much Meat And Too Little Vitamin B2

Parkinsons Disease From Too Much Meat And Too Little Vitamin B2

Many had improved so much that they were able to drive a car safely again. Riboflavin (=vitamin B2) is an important ingredient in a number of metabolic processes in brain cells that result in the production of dopamine, a brain hormone that is required for regulating muscle coordination in various parts of the brain. This translates into a stable gait, normal muscle strength, good balance and normal cognitive functioning.

These findings were reported in the July 15, 2003 issue of The Medical Post, page 31.

Link to Dr. Schilling’s Net Health Book regarding Parkinsons disease.

Last edited December 9, 2012