Aug
22
2020

New Alzheimer’s Blood Test Is Promising

A new Alzheimer’s blood test is promising according to a publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) July 29, 2020. Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating neurological illness where people lose memory and judgment. If affects about 5.8 million Americans above the age of 65. Specialists are estimating that there will be 14 million Alzheimer’s cases by the year 2050.

For many years pathologists found amyloid plaque and tau tangles in Alzheimer’s patients’ brains, which accounted for their memory loss. Researchers developed a simple, inexpensive blood test, called phospho-tau217 (p-tau217). This is one of the tau proteins that is present in both plaques and tangles of living Alzheimer’s patients.

Plaques and tangles in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease patients

Many research papers describe that senile plaques are part of the cortex of brains of Alzheimer’s patients. They consist of beta-amyloid substance and of neurofibrillary tangles.

To put it simple: This protein material is like glue, which prevents the neurons from working properly. It also causes the memory loss and the confusion so typical for Alzheimer’s patients. Over the years the question then arose, where this glue substance ”beta-amyloid” came from. Dr. Yasojima et al. pointed out that for many years it was thought that this abnormal protein would have come from the liver and was then deposited in the brain. However, this research group presented evidence that the beta-amyloid actually comes directly from the cells in the brain where it is found and also deposited.

Beta-amyloid has antioxidant function

The amyloid-beta precursor protein is important for normal membrane function in the brain. It also has a very important antioxidant function in normal brains and keeps lipoproteins, an important chemical substrate of the brain, from getting oxidized. Recent research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine linked these plaques with a loss of nitric oxide production in the brain, which would lead to a reduction of perfusion of brain blood vessels. This in turn can lead to a loss of oxygen and nutrients in the brain tissue.

Alzheimer’s patients have a regulation problem of amyloid-peptides

The Alzheimer’s patient’s brain appears to have a regulation problem where through some genetic or other mechanism, the auto-regulation of amyloid-peptides and other similar peptides appears to have been lost. There seems to be an overproduction of these peptides until they are no longer soluble. The insoluble surplus of these beta-amyloids is then deposited as the glue-like senile plaques that clog up the patient’s thinking, and reactive oxygen species are also released in these plaques damaging nerve tissue.

Back to why the new Alzheimer’s blood test is promising

Oskar Hansson, MD, PhD, Professor of Clinical Memory Research at Lund University, Sweden, stated the following. “While more work is needed to optimize the assay and test it in other people before it becomes available in the clinic, the blood test might become especially useful to improve the recognition, diagnosis, and care of people in the primary care setting.” The p-tau217 blood test mentioned at the beginning of this review correlates with the clinical condition of Alzheimer’s patients. Researchers evaluated the test in 1302 patients. Some had cognitive impairment others did not. The participants came from 3 large studies in Arizona, Sweden and Columbia. The Arizona branch provided 81 participants, Sweden provided 699 and Columbia 522.

Accuracy of the p-tau217 blood test

In the Arizona branch researchers could distinguish between with or without a “high likelihood of Alzheimer’s with an accuracy of 98%.

The Swedish BioFINDER Study discriminated between Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases with an accuracy of 96%.

Finally, in the Columbia branch of the study researchers distinguished between mutation-carriers and non-carriers. They could predict who would develop Alzheimer’s  20 years before patients developed cognitive deficits.

All of the facts are not out yet about Alzheimer’s, but it is exciting to see the recent progress both in terms of early diagnosis and Alzheimer’s treatment. On the long-term prevention, as always in medicine, will prevail as the most effective method regarding diminishing the frequency of this disease.

10 steps that everybody can do today to minimize the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease

  1. take 2000 IU of Vit. D3 per day
  2. get a T3 and T4 blood test to rule out hypothyroidism (doctors often do not order T3)
  3. Measure lead and mercury levels in urine and stool, particularly if you have more than 3 amalgamate tooth fillings
  4. If you test positive for mercury, go for intravenous chelation therapy, which specifically removes heavy metals (including mercury) from your system.
  5. People who do regular exercises and follow good nutrition get less Alzheimer’s disease. As Alzheimer’s patients are deficient in magnesium intake, it is wise to take a magnesium supplement as discussed in Ref. 22.

Further steps to prevent Alzheimer’s disease

  1. Omega-3-fatty acids (molecularly distilled Omega-3 or cod liver oil capsules etc.) and/or fish help you to preserve brain cells.
  2. Take the nutrient phosphatylserine (PS) 100 mg once daily for prevention of Alzheimer’s and dementia.
  3. Cutting out sugar and starchy food by following a low-glycemic diet brings elevated insulin levels back to normal.
  4. Mayo Clinic research recently showed that computer-based memory exercises in seniors will lead to significantly less Alzheimer’s disease in the years down the road.
  5. Progesterone cream (only bio-identical, from compounding pharmacy) has anti-Alzheimer effects. Women would incorporate this into their bio-identical hormone replacement schedule following menopause. Men would utilize the brain rejuvenating effect of testosterone into their hormone replacement routine following andropause.

Both also take small amounts of oral DHEA and pregnenolone, but have blood or saliva tests from time to time to measure hormone levels.

New Alzheimer’s Blood Test Is Promising

New Alzheimer’s Blood Test Is Promising

Conclusion

Alzheimer’s disease is a severe, disabling neurodegenerative disease of the brain. At this point there has not been an early diagnostic test. But a recent publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) describes a simple blood test, called phospho-tau217 (p-tau217). This is one of the tau proteins that is present in both plaques and tangles of living Alzheimer’s patients. A clinical trial showed that when this test is positive, it predicts up to 20 years from now that this patient likely will come down with Alzheimer’s disease. Based on this publication there will soon be a simple blood test that diagnoses Alzheimer’s disease early and reliably with an accuracy of between 96% to 98%. Lifestyle interventions may then be able to prevent the deterioration of cognitive functions. Further therapeutic interventions may come about through more research.

Part of the text was published before under the link indicated.

About Ray Schilling

Dr. Ray Schilling born in Tübingen, Germany and Graduated from Eberhard-Karls-University Medical School, Tuebingen in 1971. Once Post-doctoral cancer research position holder at the Ontario Cancer Institute in Toronto, is now a member of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M).