Oct
01
2006

Antiviral Drugs Not For Flu Prevention

With the arrival of the fall and winter season concerns about viral illnesses crop up. The most common ailment is the flu, which occurs seasonally. Prevention measures come in the forefront, and over-the-counter remedies and herbal supplements make their appearance.
Yet at this point the most effective measures remain very basic: good hygiene, hand washing, non-exposure to people who have the flu and non-sharing of personal items that could carry the virus. Flu shots for flu prevention remain the single most effective way to prevent widespread epidemics.
Antiviral agents zanamivir (also known as Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have come under discussion. They have been very effective in the treatment of influenza symptoms. It is not too late to treat with oseltamivir after the patient has been infected with the flu, as the drug prevents lower respiratory tract complications. For the symptomatic relief of influenza 75 mg per day were 61% effective, and 150 mg were 73% effective. Using the drugs strictly as a prophylaxis proved to be a fallacy. Results showed that neither zanamivir nor oseltamivir prevented influenza-like illnesses.

Antiviral Drugs Not For Flu Prevention

Antiviral Drugs Not For Flu Prevention

Even though both antiviral agents are not 100 % effective, they still can be useful in the setting of a flu pandemic. They are also of help in population groups with chronic health problems or immunocompromised persons to whom any viral infection can be serious.

More info about the flu: http://nethealthbook.com/infectious-disease/respiratory-infections/flu/

Reference: The Medical Post, September 1, 2006, page 61

Last edited November 1, 2014

Jun
01
2006

Antibacterial Hand Soaps Pose Hazard

In the quest of killing hazardous bacteria, antibacterial hand soaps are claiming a slice of the market. Bacteria can be hazardous and it remains a fact, that hand washing is an effective way to eliminate harmful bugs. It is not the quick, five-second wash under the water tab that gets rid of the bugs. The old trick of telling kids to sing the “ABC Song” while washing their hands with soap and water still has some merit: you need 20 to 30 seconds of washing and rinsing to combat bacteria effectively.
In the meantime Researchers at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health report, that the antibacterial agent in hand soaps, triclocarban, is not without risk. Triclocarban, commercially known as TCC, is a pesticide and is used extensively in soaps and body washes. One commercial survey found it in 30% of bar soaps. If it sounds questionable to the consumer to wash hands or body with a product that contains a pesticide, it rings even more alarm bells with scientists that observe the impact of the product on the environment. After 19 days of treatment time in the sewage treatment plant, 76 % of the ingredient is still present in the treated sludge. Treated sludge is later used as a fertilizer! Triclocarban is toxic when ingested and is part of toxic waste. After reviewing all these facts, the consumer has to make the decision whether overkill with antibacterial hand soaps is such a good idea.

Antibacterial Hand Soaps Pose Hazard

Antibacterial Hand Soaps Pose Hazard

Reading product labels and sticking to less toxic products may very well be the more sensible choice.

More information about:

1. Toxins in the bathroom: https://www.askdrray.com/toxins-in-the-bathroom/

2. Detoxification: https://www.askdrray.com/get-rid-of-toxins-safely/

Reference: The Medical Post, May 16, 2006, page 47

Last edited Nov. 1, 2014

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